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20121113
20121113
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a change. john boehner will be the speaker of the house, you know, unless something unforeseen happens in the next few weeks. he will be, he will keep the reign. the republicans gained, you know, a few seats, but that's not really going to effect his shot. he ran unopposed in ohio for his own race, and the defining conflict of the republican conference in the 112th congress, this sort of conflict between eric cantor, the majority leader, and john boehner, the speaker, is really behind them at least, you know, from everything that we have seen. the -- so that is remarkably stable, the first three positions. john boehner will be, you know, the next speaker, eric cantor will be the majority leader, and kevin mccarthy will be the majority whip. where it starts to get interesting is for the conference chairman position. this is currently held by jeb hensarling who is making a bid to be the financial services chairman. hensarling has been a sort of rising star for a while within republican ranks. he was a republican study committee chairman which is sort of the top conservative position in r
driving the decisions made here. i think citing i believe speaker boehner, it's fair to say that the president also believes we don't -- he's not looking to box himself in or box other people's ideas out. as we approach the conversation that will be in on friday. >> suggest to the meeting that just took place they might have to give up more than they would like? >> i think the president has made very clear that everyone, throughout this process, not just in this past week since the election, but for some time now, that the whole point of compromise is that nobody gets to achieve their maximalist position. that was the approach we took throughout negotiations in 2011 and it's the principle the president has based his own proposals on. if you look at, again, the programs that the president has already cut through legislation he signed into law, if you look at the savings he's willing to enact as part of his plan, it demonstrates a willingness to give so that you can meet your negotiating partner somewhere in the middle and reach a deal. >> you don't have any specific -- >> i d
year. that came after talks broan down between the president and house speaker john boehner. senator collins told the newshour today that she's optimistic lawmakers can still strike a deal and stave off the spending cuts. >> so this has to be done carefully. i think the president's right that -- and i've said this for a long time -- that we have to look at both revenues and spending. but there needs to be compromise on both sides. >> woodruff: but mcconnell said the president needs to put a proposal on the table if any agreement is going to pass. >> the time for the president to lead is now. that means offering a concrete plan that takes into account the fact that half the congo poses tax hikes. >> woodruff: on the democratic side house minority leader nancy pelosi rejected calls by some in the party who have argued for letting the country go over the cliff to get a better deal. >> i want you to be disabused of any notion that there's any widespread thought that it would be a good as a country for us to go over the cliff. we want an agreement. we want an agreement. >> woodruff: law m
boehner. i mean they are the most important players as to whether we get a result. secondly, i've said from day one, i've been saying it for two years, the most important piece of this, andrea, really is medicare because as you look at glen hubbard, as you look at others talking about all these things, the two are intertwined. in other words, as we see true medicare reforms and you see a real solution to medicare, where people know that we've put this behind us and we've dealt with it, i think you see the dial change as it relates to revenue. so, you know, i've been discussing revenues now for at least two years. i do think republicans are open to revenues that are put in place and a pro growth way, but i think people want to see that we've actually dealt with the problem. we haven't generated more revenues without solving the fundamental problems we have and we have what we want to do is put ourselves on a path towards fiscal solvency. i think the key here really is, medicare and to the extent you dial that up and solve it, i think you also dial the other dial which is revenues and i
can pass the alternative. but it's your problem to get the votes. and boehner would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but instead to say paul ryan's going to bring a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you, you'll get the right to have a democratic substitute. and if you can get enough republicans to vote for it, terrific. but they do not have an obligation to concede that the only mandate in washington is the president's. >> you're talking about chains hiring people for 29 hours. i'm hearing that from small business owners across pensacola. >> yeah. >> my own district. on election night i got three different e-mails from small business owners going it's sad -- and i said this on the air a couple days ago. they said i'm going to have to put these people on for less than 30 hours and i'm going to lose my best people. i can choose to do that or fire six, seven people because my margins are so small i'm fighting to keep my business open. >> you track the number of layoffs and closures in the first week since the election, it's sobering
week. host: "the baltimore sun" has a story, "boehner ways next moves." this is from "the wall street journal." "post office hint of gop path." host: "she fit a profile." so, more on leadership, which both sides will be voting for this week when they return to washington on who will be their leaders. so, we will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)